How Children are Responding back to Tobacco Industry Targeting in Uganda

As we prepare for the World No Tobacco Day on 31st 2018, young people are
Under the Kuteesa Foundation, which is a For The Boy Child organisation had a Boys’ Mentorship Program Work Experience week last week, and among the activities, the boys were involved in were skits themed Tobacco Use Affects Kids Too and Prono Is Bad for You.

Boys’ Mentorship Program on in Tobacco Control Skits to their parents

The Tobacco Use Affects Kids Too skit demonstrated in one scene a father sends his child to buy for him cigarettes. The father also asks the child later to light the cigarette for him.
It should be known that as early as 5 years, many children are exposed to tobacco-related diseases because their parents use it in their presences or areas of occupancy.
The audience which was full of parents of the sons was amazed, educated and entertained through these skits that showed them the dangers children face when exposed to tobacco smoke.
Boys sharing what looks like a cigarette

From the skit, the child steals a tobacco stick from his dad which he later shares with some of his friends. Many children after seeing their parents smoke tobacco go on to try it out, and even share with some of their close friends, and the behaviour grows.Later in the skit, we see one of the friends dying. Before DEATH, many children who use tobacco suffer from diseases like; Cancer, Heart diseases and other effects such as; Bad breath, Teeth problems, Sore mouths.
The Kuteesa foundation is one of the many advocate organisation spreading the messageof tobacco control among young people as a way of implementing the Tobacco Control Act in Uganda. The Boys’ Mentorship Programme, One Mentor One Son and the Fighters are the main tools this foundation uses to voice and spread the effects of smoking.

UNHCO Won the MPOWER Award for Enforcing Bans on Tobacco Advertising, Promotion and Sponsorship

Uganda National Health Consumers Organization Honored for its Comprehensive Advertising Bans at Bloomberg Philanthropies Awards for Global Tobacco Control

UNHCO Wins MPOWER Award for Enforcing Bans on Tobacco Advertising

Uganda National Health Consumers Organization (UNHCO), was honoured at an awards ceremony in South Africa during the Bloomberg Philanthropies Awards for Global Tobacco Control – the 17thWorld Conference on Tobacco or Health. UNHCO was given the MPOWER award forEnforcing bans on tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship.
Congratulations to Uganda National Health Consumers Organization and all of the winners for their outstanding work, which is saving lives every day, said WHO Global Ambassador for Non-communicable Diseases and Former New York City Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg.
Over the last decade the global effort to fight tobacco use has come farther than almost anyone imagined possible but we will have a long way to go, and these honorees are helping to lead the way forward.

Robinah Kaitiritimba of UNHCO at the 17th WCTOH

Uganda enacted the comprehensive Tobacco Control Act in 2015, the tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship (TAPS) measures are particularly strong and represent best practices in that they completely ban all forms, methods, and means of domestic and cross-border TAPS. The Act also includes an illustrative list of the forms, methods and means of TAPS banned, including a catch-all covering any other forms, methods or means of TAPS. UNHCO is proud to have been associated in the Tobacco Control struggle with the Ministry of Health, tobacco control advocates, and enforcement agencies, the Parliament of Uganda, Kampala City Council Authority and the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids.
One award was given in each of the MPOWER categories. MPOWER categories include:Monitoring tobacco use and prevention policies;Protecting people from tobacco smoke with smoke-free air legislation;Offering help to quit tobacco use;Warning about the dangers of tobacco with pack labels and mass media;Enforcing bans on tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship; andRaising taxes on tobacco.
“It is our noble duty to protect the young people and the future generation from the aggressive marketing and deceptive schemes of the Tobacco Industry to realize health gains. There is a lot of work to do in this area. But to start with, reform the excise taxes so that cigarettes can become more expensive regardless of the country of origin. To that end, all our eyes are on Parliament to increase the budget for the Ministry of Health to promote prevention against tobacco exposure.” stands the state from the advocates.
Honorees for 2018 are:

  • M: Vietnam Ministry of Health
  • P: Fondo Solidario para la Salud (FOSALUD) de El Salvador
  • O: Fundacin Interamericana del Corazn Mxico
  • W: Senegal Ministry of Health
  • E: Uganda National Health Consumers Organization
  • R: Argentina Ministry of Health, Ministry of Treasury, and FIC

The Bloomberg Awards for Global Tobacco Control was first hosted in 2009 at the 14thWorld Health Conference on Tobacco and or Health in Mumbai and most recently in 2015 when the 16thConference was held in Abu Dhabi.
In 2009, the four Bloomberg Awards winners were:

  • M: Environmental Right Action/Friends of the Earth Nigeria
  • P: Mexico City Secretary of Health
  • W: Action on Smoking and Health Thailand
  • E: Coalicin Panamea contra el Tabaquismo

In 2012, the Bloomberg Awards winners were:

  • M: Health Justice Philippines
  • P: Turkish National Coalition on Tobacco or Health
  • W: Uruguay Ministry of Health
  • E: Corporate Accountability International Colombia and Fundacion para la Educacion y el Desarrollo Social
  • R: Egyptian Ministry of Finance

In 2015, the Bloomberg Award winners were:

  • M: Brazil Ministry of Health and National Institute of Statistics
  • P: Regional Advocacy Life Center (Ukraine)
  • O: Uruguay Ministry of Health
  • W: Nepal Ministry of Health and Population
  • E: KONFOP
  • R: Philippines Department of Finance and Department of Health

Uganda's School Going Children Targeted to Start Tobacco Use – Report

The infographic below is curated by the Uganda National health Users /Consumers’ organisation (UNHCO) report about the Tobacco Industry advertising and selling tobacco products in shops around schools.

This is a map showing that around KCCA’s Kamwokya Primary School there are 6 temporary kiosks, 1 Convenience store selling tobacco products, 6 posters, 1 advertisement on a building and 3 billboards.

With emphasis from the African Tobacco Alliance, it has been concluded that the tobacco companies are targeting school children in Africa by advertising and promoting cigarettes around schools.
Uganda has been named as one on the countries in Africa that are contravening the World Health Organisation (WHO) laws on Tobacco control laws but the Tobacco Industry is undermining this law by targeting schools in Kampala, Mukono and Jinja have shops around them selling cigarettes.
The report revealed that majority schools surveyed have shops selling cigarettes and mainly single sticks, displayed next to sweets and snacks.
Deowan Mohee, the executive director African Tobacco Control Alliance (ATCA) said while releasing the report to the media a few weeks ago that;
Studies show that tobacco advertising and sales around schools encourage children to smoke. Previously secret internal tobacco industry documents released as a result of U.S litigation settlements show that tobacco companies have purposefully targeted students and directed their advertising and promotions to stores near schools.
Uganda recently passed a Tobacco control Law prohibiting smoking in public places and workplaces. Tobacco products such as Shisha, electronic nicotine and smokeless or flavoured tobacco products were also banned.
According to WHO, tobacco use is one of the biggest public health threats, killing about 6 million people annually. More than five million of those deaths are the result of direct tobacco use, while more than 600 000 are the result of non-smokers being exposed to second-hand smoke.
Leonce Sessou, the communication Manager ATCA said African government authorities must protect our children from the tactics of the tobacco companies. We are calling on our governments and policymakers to enforce existing legislation governing tobacco advertising, promotion and sale,
In 2008 WHO reported that people who do not start smoking before the age of 21 are unlikely to start.
Moses Talibita from UNHCO said they are requesting churches to sensitize the public about the dangers of tobacco use.
Countries that participated in the study the research forBig Tobacco Tiny Targets included Uganda, Nigeria, Benin and Burkina Faso.

Uganda Government urged to raise tobacco tax

Tobacco haspassed the test of being the most toxic legal product which kills its users when used according to prescription.
The Government of Uganda is urged by the Uganda Tobacco Control Coordination forum save lives by raising the tobacco tax, amending the Excise Duty Act, and Avoiding Destructive Legal Tussle.
On the 25th January 2018, the East African Court of Justice granted BATU an interim injunction on the collection of excise duty that is over and above the amounts levied on Ugandan products in the Ugandan Market.
The background is that, in 2017, Parliament amended the Excise Duty Act, imposing the different excise tax on cigarettes and alcoholic beverages with lower rates for products produced in Uganda and higher rates for similar imported products. This differential taxation is the basis for the legal challenge from British American Tobacco.
According to the company, imposing a different excise duty on goods from Kenya as opposed to similar goods from Uganda contravenes the Treaty for the establishment of the East African Community and the Protocol on the establishment of the East African Customs Unions of 2004.
As World Trade Organization Agreements also emphasizes the principle of non-discrimination between domestic and imported products, it is possible that similar suits will follow from WTO partners who export cigarettes to Uganda, such as countries that host Philip Morris International, a major cigarette producer with products in our market.
The current legal challenge from BATU and other potential suits could very well delayUganda from implementing life-saving increases in tobacco tax.
The Government of Uganda risks being drawn into an unhelpful legal battle over tobacco tax. This battle will ultimately be costly in terms of lives lost to tobacco-caused disease if the government is delayed in its good faith, evidence-based efforts to raise taxes on tobacco.

The government should instead focus on raising tobacco excise tax and updating the Excise Duty Act to eliminate the issues being contested.
We recommend that the Government of Uganda move to amend the Excise Duty Act to provide for equal treatment for locally manufactured and imported tobacco products. By doing this, the country will comply with Ugandas obligations and commitments under the Uganda Tobacco Control Act, the EAC Treaties and protocols and WTO agreements.
Further, we recommend that Uganda avoids engaging in the legal tussle of appealing the judgment of the EAC Court, given the legal commitments the country has made. Tobacco use creates a significant economic burden on society due to high direct and indirect health costs associated with tobacco-related diseases, disability, and premature loss of life.
In Uganda, the total health cost of tobacco use including direct cost of treatment, indirect costs of loss of income, and productivity from death and disability is UGX 328.82 Billion (USD 126.48).
Article 6 of the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, to which Uganda is a party, obligates parties to use tax measures to reduce tobacco consumption by ensuring the high price of tobacco products, while at the same time increasing government revenue to address its negative economic and health effects.
Under the treaty, Uganda is legally obligated to raise excise tax for all tobacco products to reduce affordability thereby reducing tobacco consumption, as well as reducing government expenditure on tobacco-related health care costs associated with tobacco consumption.
Tobacco has passed the test of being the most toxic legal product which kills its users when used according to prescription. WHO has stated that tobacco kills up to half of its users because it contains more than 7000 chemicals, of which at least 250 are known to be harmful and at least 69 are known to cause cancer.
The taxation of the tobacco productsis, therefore, a way of promoting public health by increasing the price. Economic interests of tobacco companies should therefore not supersede human rights and public health.
To ensure the maximum health and economic benefits, the government should consider the following options:

  1. Tobacco Tax should be regularly raised in consideration of inflation rates and increase in income to reduce affordability especially for young people and the poor.
  2. Adopt the WHO FCTC recommended tax system for tobacco products, which is the specific and uniform (no tiers of a soft cap or hinge lid) tax system.
  3. The tax should be increased progressively until the share of the excise tax to the total retail price per pack is above 70%.
  4. Apply the same excise tax for both local tobacco products and the imported tobacco products in line with the WHO FCTC recommendations.
  5. Prevent illicit trade through tax evasion by acceding to and implementing the provisions of the Protocol for Elimination of Illicit Trade in Tobacco Products.

Uganda takes lead in African for Tobacco Control

This year, the day was held under the theme Get prepared for plain packaging. Plain packaging of tobacco products refers to measures that restrict or prohibit the use of logos, colors, brand images or promotional information on packaging other than brand names and product names displayed in a standard color and font style.
Uganda has taken lead in Africa by fulfilling its obligations to enact a comprehensive Tobacco Control Act. This law was launched during the World No Tobacco Day commemoration at a breakfast meeting in Imperial Royale Hotel. World No Tobacco Day is celebrated every 31 st May to highlight the dangers of tobacco use and exposure to tobacco smoke.
Dr. Maina from World Health Organization noted that plain packaging is an important demand-reduction measure that reduces the attractiveness of tobacco products, restricts the use of tobacco packaging as a form of tobacco advertising and promotion, limits misleading packaging and labeling and increases the effectiveness of health warnings. It also complements other strategies on tobacco control.
Hon. Elioda Tumwesigye who also represented the Guest of Honor, Prime Minister of Uganda noted that this is the strongest tobacco control law in the region. The Global Adult Tobacco Survey indicates that about 10% of Ugandans use tobacco among adults while among the youth it’s much higher at 17%. He highlighted that some of the disturbing emerging trends include a rise of tobacco use among women and youth. The increase also noted the introduction of the non-conventional use of tobacco especially shisha (water pipe tobacco) and chewed tobacco such as kuber. Electronic cigarettes have also been introduced in Uganda.
Hon. Tumwesigye urged Ugandans to follow H.E. Yoweri Museveni as a role model for healthy lifestyles. Ugandans should emulate President Yoweri Museveni who leads by example in promoting a healthy lifestyle. We have a leader who does not drink alcohol or consume tobacco products and engages in physical activity. This promotes a healthy lifestyle and a healthy nation at large he said.
Globally, the consumption of tobacco products leads to the death of more than 5 million people.Tobacco is one of the leading preventable risk factors for non-communicable diseases such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, chronic lung disease, and diabetes.
Minister of State for General Duties, Dr. Chris Baryomunsi, was recognized by World HealthOrganization in 2015 as one of the global champions in tobacco control informed that Uganda is still grappling with an increase in noncommunicable diseases notably high blood pressure and other heart diseases and cancers which is attributed to the consumption of tobacco products. This has been backed by research conducted in Uganda and in different parts of the world.
The passing of the tobacco control law has the following provisions;
1. Establishment of a Tobacco Control Committee chaired by Office of the Prime Minister with the Secretariat at the Ministry of Health.
2. Tobacco smoke-free environment by prohibiting smoking in all public places, workplaces, means of transport and other outdoor space within 50metres of a public place
3. Display of notices stopping smoking in the public places with words in English, Kiswahili and local languages spoken in the region.
4. The law completely bans advertising, promotion, and sponsorship by tobacco manufacturers, distributors, and sellers (usually referred to as Tobacco Industry) including points of sale in shops etc.
5. The law bans some tobacco products including Shisha (waterpipe tobacco), smokeless tobacco such as Kuber which is chewed and flavored tobacco products. The law further bans the production, sale, and use of electronic cigarettes which are being promoted by the tobacco industry.
6. The Tobacco Control Act bans supply and involvement in processes of production, sale, and use of tobacco by people below 21years of age (referred to as minors)
7. The law bans importation, manufacture, and sale of tobacco products which do not conform to standards of government regarding contents of the products and their emissions when used.
The contents and emissions will be elaborated in the regulations.
8. To protect public health policies for tobacco control, the law bans unnecessary interactions with tobacco businesses, giving incentives and privileges for tobacco businesses and receiving voluntary contributions from those businesses. Public Servants can only interact for official work of regulation and because this must be transparent, regulations governing such interactions will be developed and disseminated to government officials.
9. The law provides for authorized people to enforce it in addition to the usual law enforcement agents including police, environment protection officers, Health Inspectors and MunicipalityEnforcement Officers.
Dr. Sheila Ndyanabangi, Program Manager for Mental Health and Substance abuse was commended for her unwavering support in passing the Tobacco Control Law.
The Ministry appreciated the media, development partners and civil society organizations for their continued support in sensitizing and enhancing public awareness on the consumption and dangers of tobacco products and appealed to Ugandans to ensure full implementation of this law to prevent the population from the devastating effects of tobacco and its products.
SOURCE: MinistryOf Health

Why a higher tax on cigarettes bears more gains than protecting local cigarette manufacturers?

In 2017 parliament of Uganda amended the excise duty Act no. 11 of 2014. The Excise duty (Amendment) no. 11 of 2017 in section 2 imposes different excise rates on locally and foreign made cigarettes (soft cap and Hinge lid).
This amendment is a matter of contention in the East African Court of Justice that slapped an injunction on Uganda (Revenue Authority) on the 25th of January 2018 to stop forthwith collecting billed excise duty on British American Tobacco (U) LTD that shifted operations to Kenya.
While at Hotel Piato on the 7th of February 2018 in a CSO and members of School management committees of Schools in Kampala organised by the Uganda national Health Consumers Organisation, Hon. Isaac Mulindwa Soozi, the Lugazi Municipality Member of parliament and member of the finance committee of parliament, said that they (MPs) imposed higher excise duties on Foreign manufacturers to protect the local cigarette manufacturers.
Hon. Andrew Kaluya member of parliamentfor Kigulu County South,Iganga District, disagreed with the notion of protecting any cigarette manufactures because they both manufacture products that need strong controls among which banning the products from Uganda and availing alternative crops to farmers makes the most feasible argument. I with great pleasure acknowledge that Uganda removed Tobacco from its priority of Crops.
It must be recalled that section 23 (a) of the Tobacco Control Act no.22 of 2015, prohibits persons that contribute to or may contribute to the formulation….of public health policies on tobacco control from providing any incentive, benefits or privileges or preferential tax exemptions to the tobacco industry.
Incidentally, Tobacco manufacturers agree that tobacco use affects the lungs, causes heart diseases and kill its consumers as prescribed on their packs. A National NCD risk factor survey conducted in 2014 shows that one in every four adults in Uganda suffers from a Non-Communicable Disease.
And yet the Centre for Tobacco Control Africa (CTCA) in 2017 found that, the total health cost of tobacco use including the direct cost of treatment and the indirect costs of loss of income and productivity from death and disability in Uganda is UGX 328.82 billion, which is equivalent to US$126.48 million.
Expensive cigarettes translate to health gains
When taxes raise cigarettes prices, the poor get more health benefits than the rich. The relationship between price and income is very important. When prices increase faster than salaries, people must earn more to afford their cigarettes, which decreases cigarette consumption and increases the rate of quitting.
WHO calculates that if all countries increase taxes on cigarette packs by 50% there would be 49 million fewer smokers and this would avert 11 million deaths from smoking based on unpublished WHO simulations using the 2012 data).
The benefits of cessation are many and occur for a number of serious diseases soon after quitting. Only one year after quitting smoking, the risk of coronary heart diseases is about half that of a smoker. The stroke risk is reduced to that of non- smokers 5 to 15 years after quitting. After10 years of cessation, the risk of lung cancer fails to about half that of a smoker, and there is a decreased risk of cancer of the mouth, throat, oesophagus, bladder, cervix and pancreas according to WHO.
France, for example, increased its taxes substantially and regularly between the early 1990s and 2005, tripling its inflation-adjusted cigarette prices. This was followed by a reduction in sales by more than 50%. The health impact of this dramatic reduction in consumption was seen just a few years later with a reduction in lung cancer death rates for young men. Death rates went down by 50% during the same period. After a period of unchanged tax rates between 2005 and 2009, France has started to regularly increase tobacco taxes since 2010.
 
Raising taxes on tobacco improves economies for Government
In addition to reducing tobacco use and the associated health burden, tax increases generate substantial additional revenues to governments. Tax increases are a win-win situation because they are good for both public health and government revenues. Government revenues raised in this way can be used for health and other public benefit.
In Egypt, the government substantially increased the tobacco tax in 2010. The tax per pack for the most popular brand of cigarettes increased by 46% from 2.95 Egyptian pounds (EGP) to 4.32 EGP. This reduced sales by 14% in only two years. The impact on revenues was colossal, increasing by 151%, from 7 billion EGP to 17.6 EGP between 2010 and 2012.
Simple tax systems are
A number of countries around the world impose complex systems of tobacco excise, which are difficult to administer and subject to loopholes. The tobacco industry takes advantage of these loopholes to avoid paying the full amount of taxes. The resulting loss of revenues for the government and the difficulty to translate into price increases and reduced affordability for consumers makes these taxes and tax increases ineffective.
This reduced the tax tiers from four to two in 2013 and will bring them down to a single uniform rate in 2017. The reform also removed tax obligations which favoured one company over another. In addition, a provision was introduced to have automatic annual increases in the tax until 2017, with more rapid tax increases on lower priced brands.
Since implementing the reform in 2013, the Government reports that tobacco prices have gone up, sales have gone down and revenues have increased substantially.
In the African region, Gambia changed the base for its excise on cigarettes from weight to volume in 2012. Evidence shows that basing taxes on weight of tobacco encourages the industry to produce lighter but not less harmful cigarettes to pay less taxes.
In 2013, Gambia also raised the excise on all tobacco products to the same rate. This has the benefit of discouraging consumers from switching to a cheaper product when taxes are increased. Governments around the world tend to impose higher taxes on cigarettes than on other tobacco products, leading to price differences and encouraging substitution from higher priced products (usually cigarettes) to cheaper tobacco products such as water pipe tobacco or roll-your-own cigarettes. Taxing all products similarly leads to a harmonization of prices and reduces incentives for substitution.
Cheap cigarettes obtaining on the Ugandan market are a result of our weak tax law that makes tax administration difficult and thus making the routine tax imposing every financial year a nuisance to quitting and generating revenue so as to case a health dividend to cut health expenditure relations with tobacco caused diseases.
Talibita Moses, Is a tobacco control Activist working with Uganda National Health Consumers Organisation
mtalibita@unhco.or.ug

KCCA and Uganda Police Inspect Businesses in Kampala for compliance to The Tobacco Control Law

Tobacco Control advocate agency Uganda National Health Consumers’ Organisation (UNHCO) conducted spot on health inspections, audits and sensitization exercises of businesses and business areas in the Kampala divisions of Nakawa, Rubaga, Kawempe, Makindye and Central area to support enforcement of the Tobacco Control Act for compliance.
The Tobacco Control Act (2015) is a public health act that amply empowers all citizens of Uganda to enforce its declaration, including the total ban on shisha and the 50-metre rule. It has been completely enforceable since May 2017.
The Tobacco Control Act (2015) Section 16 places a TOTAL BAN on the importation, sell, offer for sale, or distribute of; Shisha (which is a flavoured water-pipe tobacco product) and/or shisha pots (which is a water-pipe delivery system). The penalty is a severe fine of not less than 20,000,000 UGX.
UNHCO worked with a team of government and civil society agencies including, Ministry of Health, Uganda Police Force (i.e.; CPS/Anti-Narcotics Department), Kampala City Council Authority, Ministry of Local Government, National Environment Management Authority and Uganda National Bureau of Standards.
During the inspection in the communities, traders were eager to listen closely to health and police inspectors, as they shared the details of the Tobacco Control Act.
And a way to ensure enforcement, there was a trader who was found illegally selling banned shisha products, who attempted to argue with the health and police inspectors claiming that he had legal paperwork permitting him to sell the illegal products.  On delivery of the papers, the agents from URA during the inspections proved that the forms provided were in contempt of the law. All business owners should know that SHISHA IS A BANNED TOBACCO PRODUCT.
It should be known by all business owners that SHISHA IS A BANNED TOBACCO PRODUCT in Uganda.

'We are scared we will die soon', Tobacco Workers.

Folarin Jakanola died from a sickness he developed from the working environment he was exposed to while working with British-American Tobacco, Nigeria. “We were exposed to the same environment and we are going through serious health problems. We are scared we will die soon.”
“We were exposed to the same environment and we are going through serious health problems. We are scared we will die soon.”
Listen in to the below podcast for more information.

CTFK Statement: U.S. Authorities Urged to Investigate British American Tobacco for Allegations of Widespread Bribery and Corruption in Africa

Following new allegations about the conduct of British American Tobacco (BAT) in Africa –published today by The Guardian – the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids (CTFK) urged the U.S. Department of Justice and the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission to investigate BAT and its subsidiaries for possible violations of the anti-bribery and accounting provisions of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA). Tobacco-Free Kids requested the investigation in a letter to the two government agencies.
British American Tobacco has faced mounting allegations that the company engaged in widespread bribery and corruption in Africa to gain an advantage over competitors and stifle government efforts to curb smoking.
Earlier this month, the U.K. Serious Fraud Office (SFO) formally launched an investigation of BAT on suspicions of corruption. An investigative report published today by The Guardian revealed new allegations that, for years, BAT secretly and possibly illegally moved millions of U.S. dollars in cash across international borders into the war-torn Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) allegedly to support the company’s tobacco leaf operations in that country.
The new allegations indicate BAT’s operations included engaging with armed rebels involved in the long-standing DRC conflict in order to make secret cash drops used to pay for tobacco leaf from farmers in Auzi, an unmapped town BAT built in the 1950’s, according to The Guardian.
In addition to possible violations of the FCPA, The Guardian report raises questions about whether BAT’s conduct in moving U.S. dollars during the DRC conflict also violates federal anti-money laundering laws, especially as the U.S. has had sanctions in place against the DRC since 2006. The story also exposes BAT’s role in flooding South Sudan with its cheapest cigarette brands following years of war and operating around terrorist networks in Somalia to continue selling cigarettes in the country.
The growing allegations about BAT’s conduct are particularly alarming following the July 2017 merger of BAT and Reynolds American in the United States. The recent merger places BAT in a leading position in the U.S. market and, according to BAT, created the largest tobacco company in the world by operating profits.
“Given British American Tobacco’s decades-long history of calculated deception in the United States and abroad and its re-entry into the U.S. market, the mounting allegations of corruption and mass concealment of funds by BAT must be fully investigated by U.S. regulators for possible violations of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and any other applicable criminal or civil laws,” said Matthew L. Myers, President of the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids. “This is a company that has proven it cannot and will not play by the rules. Unless and until they are held accountable by governments, shareholders, business partners and the public, the company’s wrongdoing will only continue.”
Alleged corruption within BAT was first publicly exposed in November 2015 when the BBC, and later other news outlets, revealed allegations that the company was engaging in bribery and other corrupt acts that included bribing Ministry of Health officials in Burundi, Comoros and Rwanda, a former Kenyan Minister of Justice and a Member of Parliament from Uganda.
Tobacco use kills more than seven million people worldwide each year. Without urgent action by governments to pass proven tobacco control laws and curb the power and influence of tobacco companies, tobacco use will kill one billion people this century.

Tobacco Control Regional Media Training

The Uganda Health Communication Alliance (UHCA) is a professional organisation that brings together journalists and other communication professionals from non-government organisations, government and academia.
UHCA is also a Tobacco Control Advocate organisation that uses its influence with the media to promote, inform and guide journalists on how to broadcast and report about the Tobacco Control activities in Uganda.
This week, UHCA is travelling the country talking to media practitioners about the need to report about the implement the Tobacco Control Law.  Below in images are the session;

The above images are during the media training in Western Uganda on the Tobacco Control Act, dangers of tobacco use, Tobacco Industry tactics and emphasizing compliance.  In this region UHCA covered districts of Fortportal, Kibito, Kyenjojo, Kyegegwa and Kasese.
The picture below also from South western Uganda in the districts of Bushenyi, Ntungamo, and Mbarara, also  had the same focus as the one above.

We will be sharing more about these regional Tobacco Control media training in our next update.